Winnetka Workshop Catalog

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Keynote speaker : Colson Whitehead.

Session 3

21st Century Voter Supression

A group discussion about the methods and regulations used in the US to deny or limit the voting rights of various minority groups. There will be a brief historical overview of American voting with short video clips. The main emphasis of the workshop will be how to recognize, identify, and combat modern voter suppression tactics. Attendees should come out with a few concrete plans or ideas to help address the problem moving forward.

Discussion, Collaborative Work

Advancing Civil Rights or Reverse Discrimination?: Affirmative Action in Elite College Admissions (Part 1 of 2)

In this session, Professor OiYan Poon will provide a brief historical and legal overview of affirmative action policy as applied to selective college admissions. She will address common myths, which often unnecessarily incite racial tensions and anxiety. The presentation will be followed by an interactive activity that will give participants some insights into how affirmative action is enacted today in admissions processes at selective colleges and universities. This is a double-session workshop. Students must register for both sessions.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion

Affordable Housing and Racial Diversity

Should communities set policies so people who work there can afford to live there? What constitutes "affordable" housing? How do these questions connect to racial diversity on the North Shore? Why does diversity even matter?

Speaker or Presentation

Appropriation vs. Appreciation: A Student-led Discussion on Culture

Students will be presented with some of the history of cultural appropriation in America and discuss current controversies over popular culture, media, musical expression, costumes, hair, sports mascots, and film representations of different cultures. While the session will begin with a presentation, students signing up for this session should be prepared to actively participate in the discussion.

Discussion

Artistic Responses to Racism From a Dance Perspective

Through the use of historical video and audio clips, this session will share examples of how black dance artists (Alvin Ailey, Misty Copeland and others) developed a better understanding of their racial identity through the art of dance.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion, Media Viewing

Behind the Veil of Racism: Jane Elliot and Honest Conversations

In this session, participants will study the work of Jane Elliot through art and literature as it relates to Black and Brown people in America today.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion

Black Gospel Music - Make a Joyful Noise!

Black gospel music speaks to the issue of freedom and in many ways has been part of the civil rights movement. In this workshop, you will learn about different aspects of gospel music, and then have the opportunity to sing and form an impromptu gospel choir. Participants should be prepared to sing and rasie your voice so that you can feel the power gospel music has to inspire and effect change.

Interactive

Blackenomics 101 (The Movement, The Music, The Solution)

Rapper, entrepreneur, and activist, John the Author explores systemic racism in relation to building a black business and artist presence in minority communities. Empowering and embracing blackness is a way to move beyond the inequities seen in our country.

Speaker or Presentation, Peformance

Cities of Peace: From Values to Actions

Cities of Peace is a cultural exchange program connecting young activists in Cambodia and Chicago around issues of state and interpersonal violence, community resistance, and healing. Join founding organizers Irina Zadov and Moses Williams for a short documentary film screening and a chance to interrogate your own sense of justice. Using movement and active listening activities, participants will create personal frameworks to move from values to action in their personal, family, school, and digital lives.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion

Civil Wrongs and Civil Rights

If you could rule the world, what would you do ? Identify ten workable solutions for addressing systematic racism.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion, Collaborative Work, Simulation or other Interactive Activity

Comedy and Civil Rights

This session will take a look at comedy focused on race and its role in the civil rights movement, both past and present. Through various video and audio clips, we'll explore how stand-up performers and TV comedy series have provided social commentary aimed to challenge our notions of race through the use of humor.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion, Media Viewing

Empowering Upstanders: Using History to Inform our Actions Today

Everyone has a story and a voice. Who chooses to take a stand on behalf of themselves and others? We will look at historical photographs, film and a graphic novel to find out what we can do today to be upstanders instead of bystanders in our community today. How does an inclusive society benefit us all?

Discussion, Collaborative Work, Media Viewing

Examining Our Biases

To create an environment where everyone feels valued, we must recognize our personal biases and the impact they have on ourselves and others. Through interactive exercises lead by a conflict management specialist, participants will challenge their personal assumptions about many dimensions of diversity, assess the ramifications of these unchallenged assumptions, and consider how biases affect daily decisions. Lastly, we will discuss what steps we can take to develop a more inclusive environment at New Trier and in our communities.

Simulation or other Interactive Activity

From Alcatraz to the Dakota Access Pipeline: American Indian Civil Rights

This session will explore American Indian attempts to gain civil rights in American society. The session will include discussions of the Indian occupation of Alcatraz, the standoff at Wounded Knee, and the current controversy surrounding the Dakota Access Pipeline.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion, Media Viewing

From Diversity to Inclusion: True stories. Real people. Just actions.

This workshop is based on real-life experiences of multicultural & transracial families. We will use everyday scenarios to start conversation and evaluation about known and unknown assumptions we all have around difference. The session will emphasize the importance of inclusive families, schools, communities, and laws. By evaluating individual bias, constructing a cultural competence action plan, and applying it to everyday interactions, participants leave this workshop checking personal assumptions, identifying where those assumptions originate, and responding more appropriately to racial and cultural difference.

Discussion, Simulation or other Interactive Activity

Get Up, Stand Up

Music has been an essential aspect of the Civil Rights Movement, protest, and identity in the US. This workshop will explore, through active participation, the music that has been used by generations to shine a light on marginalized populations throughout the world. Participants are encouraged to bring an instrument OR be willing to sing, shake a tambourine, maraca, or bang on a drum to fully engage in this important music

Collaborative Work, Performance, Simulation or other Interactive Activity

Home Sweet Home: Systemic Racism in Housing

Home, sweet home? In this session we will examine the roots of structural racism in housing policy and its long term implications. How have many African Americans been denied the American dream of home ownership and how has the denial of that dream had long term implications for black families hoping to become solidly middle class in America? The session will cover historical practices like redlining during the Great Depression, as well as current predatory lending and real estate steering practices.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion, Collaborative Work, Simulation or other Interactive Activity

Implicit and Explicit Biases and Their Effect on Law Enforcement and the Community

In this session, Officer Owusu will define what implicit and explicit biases are and explore what effect they have within the judicial system and law enforcement.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion

Latinos in the U.S.A.

Latinos have a long history of contributing to U.S. culture and society which is often ignored or glossed over. We will explore ways in which Latinos are continuing to enrich the experience of all Americans, so that we can gain a better understanding of the integral role they play in our society.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion

Mass Incarceration: Race and Prison in America

America accounts for 4% of the world's population but 25% of the world's prison population. One in every fifteen people born in the United States in 2001 is expected to go to jail or prison. One in three black male babies born in this century is expected to be incarcerated, and no other country imprisons such a high percentage of its racial or ethnic minorities. This session will explore the development of mass incarceration and its consequences.

Speaker or Presentation

Microaggressions: Voices from Literature

This presentation will ask participants to read short selections by Claudia Rankine and Ta-Nehisi Coates and join in a discussion about what microaggressions are and how they contribute to systemic racism. These seemingly small events reveal a huge gap between what one person intends and what another person perceives. By looking at these situations in writing, we hope to raise awareness that cause unintended pain and build empathy.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion, Media Viewing

Mixed-Race at New Trier: Discussion and Resources

This is a discussion group for students who identify as mixed-race to talk, listen, and learn about the mixed-race experience at New Trier. Topics will include passing for white, feeling between identities, and code switching. A list of high-school and post-high-school resources will be provided. Students of all racially mixed identities are invited to participate.

Discussion

Music Vs. Gun Violence

"If music can motivate someone to pick up a gun, can it also inspire them to put the guns down?" With this simple question, Music Vs Gun Violence was born in October 2015 It is a social movement spearheaded by Chicago Ideas, Leo Burnett Chicago, and Grammy-nominated Anthony "The Twilite Tone" Khan that aims to prevent gun violence through music. The campaign features "Put The Guns Down," an interactive music video that includes a string of performances from some of Chicago's best-known hip-hop and rap artists, such as Oscar and Grammy Award-winner Common, Lil Herb and King Louie, and allows you to download the beat and upload your own anti-gun violence lyrics. With each new submission on MusicVsGunViolence.com, the video and support for the initiative continues to make a difference against our city's biggest issue. The campaign has been featured in Rolling Stone, People, the Huffington Post and across the landscape of local Chicago media.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion

Native Americans, Pipelines, and Eminent Domain

In the news this fall, the fight over the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline continued for months as protestors and police clashed on the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation. This presentation and discussion focuses on the relevant constitutional law and historical treatment of Native Americans. This seminar aims to bring the issues surrounding this marginalized community to consideration.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion

Not a Day Has Passed

Not A Day Has Passed is a slideshow based on a brief article by Lee Mun Wah that reviews the racial events of violence and loss we have experienced over the past few years across the nation as well as within our community. We will review the article and watch the slideshow. We will discuss the impact of the events featured in the slideshow and talk about how they impact our experience at New Trier.

Discussion, Media Viewing

One Person One Vote: Can the Voting Rights Act Be Saved?

One of the key achievements of the Civil Rights Movement was protecting voting rights through the passage of the Voting Rights Act and the 24th amendment. In recent years more and more Americans have found their ability to vote restricted by new voter ID laws, limits on early voting, inadequate election day facilities, and voter disenfranchisement. How can we ensure that everyone's voice is heard, regardless of race, class, or geography? This session will briefly explore the history of voting rights, and ask students to engage in a variety of activities exploring current limits on voting access.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion, Media Viewing, Simulation or other Interactive Activity

Our World in the 21st Century, Our Rights in a Global Society

This interactive workshop will attempt to connect the lives of students with contemporary struggles of civil rights in the United States and their relevance to human rights. Using Maslow's hierarchy of needs as a guide, the presenter will demonstrate how each struggle is an effort to bring basic resources to communities in need.

Simulation or other Interactive Activity, Discussion

Poetry and Race

Come join the discussion about how poetry and race relate! We'll talk about poetry, perform/read some pieces, and you'll even have a chance to write your own poem. We're looking at race through the lens of poetry, and it's going to be awesome!

Performance, Discussion

R.E.A.L.: Race, Equity, and Leadership - A Unique Course for High School Students (Part 1 of 2)

Experience a snapshot of a unique high school course that is grounded in the Courageous Conversations Protocol and designed on a college seminar model. Through interactive activities, videos, and discussion prompts, develop a deeper understanding of culturally relevant pedagogy and how it empowers students to become leaders for racial equity. This is a double-session workshop. Students must register for both sessions.

Speaker or Presentation

Race, Class, and Police Interactions

Attorney Michael Robbins's most publicized case was in defense of the family of Laquan McDonald, the teenage boy shot by police in 2014. It was the dashcam video of that shooting that set off protests throughout the Chicago area and received national attention. Hear Robbins and his partner talk about the challenges they confront as they defend the legal rights of minorities.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion

Rap with a Social Conscience: Exploring Race in Contemporary Music

We will examine the lyrics of several contemporary rap songs as we explore deeper meanings, historical context, cultural impact, and their intersections with race. Additionally, students will have the opportunity to analyze a song of their choosing.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion, Collaborative Work, Media Viewing, Performance

Riot by Gwendolyn Brooks: Racially Motivated Violence Brought to Our Doorstep

Can people living in a community like ours really understand the motivations and actions of a marginalized black community? Brooks' short poem explores this question through by recounting one man's experience during a riot.

Discussion

Seeing the Unseen - The Bias All Around You (Part 1 of 2)

Most systemic racism is invisible...often to both "sides"...until you know it's there. Once you know it's there, you can't stop seeing it. In this workshop, you'll participate in an activity that will help you see the unseen, and possibly recognize some systemic biases that you see every day without realizing they are there. This is a double-period session. Students must register for both periods.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion, Simulation or other Interactive Activity

Setting Examples for Self-Love

This performance and writing workshop focuses on body and self-image positivity centered on embracing womanhood and blackness in the current culture.

Speaker or Presentation, Peformance

Socialization and Implicit Bias

How do messages we've received throughout our lives impact the way we see our own and others' racial identities? We'll work to recognize our own implicit biases and identify actions that allow us to start changing these old patterns.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion

Socially Raised to Not Understand Racism: Racism in America 1991-2017

The patterned, shape-shifting nature of racism in the post-2007 election era makes the symptoms and disease of the man-made social factor of "race" visible. The often proclaimed idea that Americans are post-racial has been continually revealed to be false after each racial tragedy in the post-2007 election era. This workshop will position individuals to recognize and understand what racism is and what racism does throughout all three levels of American life in order for them to undergo the process of racial healing that can eradicate racism in their lives.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion

SPENT: A simulation to see how long you can survive on minimum wage.

Have you ever thought about what it would be like to live on minimum wage? What decisions do people on minimum wage have to make in order to make ends meet?

In this session, you will have the chance to put yourselves in the shoes of someone who lives week to week in this situation. Through an online simulation, you will be given a minimum wage job and you must make decisions to try to make it to the end of the month with enough money left over to pay your rent. We will explore the role that race plays in this experience - specifically, how systemic racism inherent in policies and institutions presents additional obstacles to people of color trying to get out of poverty.

Simulation or other Interactive Activity

Take a Knee? Colin Kaepernick, Activism, and Symbols of America

Colin Kaepernick's kneeling during the national anthem has raised several questions that rattle or reinforce perspectives on American civil society. Come discuss and share your ideas on how identity shapes the way we interpret symbols. Time will be allotted so that students can share their ideas and respectfully disagree with one another.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion

Taking Action Against Injustice

Explore the importance of identifying biases and challenging stereotypes. Discover ways to create change in your own life.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion

That's So Ghetto: Exploring Race in Everyday Language

In this interactive workshop, we will explore how race plays out in our everyday language. Is it an example of political correctness, or is it a microagression?

Simulation or other Interactive Activity, Discussion

The 1968 Olympics and the Salute Heard Round the World

After placing 1st and 3rd in the 200 meter final of the 1968 Olympics, two black American athletes received their medals with heads bowed and fists raised in the air while a third white athlete stood with them. This seminar will focus on the context of this event and the told and untold story of all three athletes captured in this iconic photo, as a means to explore the large and small impacts that come with standing up for what you believe.

Speaker or Presentation, Media Viewing

Theft or Homage? A Discussion of Cultural Appropriation

In music, many idioms have their origins in African American culture and history. However, many of these are forms have been absorbed in all American Culture. Jazz and blues are great examples. Years ago, mixed bands were considered a step of progress. Now it is not uncommon to hear the expression, "white people stole jazz," and bands are increasingly segregated again. How can we take this paradigm shift and turn it into a force for healing?

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion, Media Viewing

Thin Red Line: The Adopted Asian-American Struggle with Identity and Sense of Place

International adoptions often involve Asian children placed with White couples in the U.S. This session will explore the question of identity for these adoptees, who may feel a dissociation from their place of birth as well as the community in which they have been raised.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion, Media Viewing

Trump, Clinton, and Obama: How do Race and Gender Affect Portrayal in the Media?

Does the media cover people differently based solely on their race, ethnicity and gender? Are there different standards for public figures of different races and genders? I'll show you some examples to get the conversation started, but I really want to hear YOUR thoughts about what is really going on, how we got here, and where we're going.

Discussion, Media Viewing

Urban Initiatives: Impacting Communities through Sport

A recent study suggests that while kids from high income families participate in youth sports at a rate of over 70%, that number is nearly cut in half for low income families. What are the benefits of such participation? Why and how is youth sports access an issue of civil rights? Explore these questions with Urban Initiatives, a sports-based youth development organization that works with over 15,000 students in 51 schools across Chicago to empower youth to become agents of community change through academic success, healthy living, and leadership development.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion

We Charge Genocide: An Emergence of a Continued Movement

Monica Trinidad was one of eight youth delegates to travel to the United Nations in Geneva, Switzerland to deliver a report on police violence against youth of color in Chicago in November of 2014 . Monica will share her organizing work with We Charge Genocide, which was a grassroots effort named after the original petition of the same name in 1951. Her presentation will include video footage from Chicago and the United Nations in Geneva. She will then lead a hands-on workshop that will guide participants through a discussion of the Black Lives Matter movement today.

Speaker or Presentation, Simulation or other Interactive Activity

What Are You? When Race Is Not "Black" and "White"

Have you ever been asked "What are you?" upon meeting someone? Are you all mixed up on being Bi-and Multi-racial? We will explore our Bi-and Multi-racial selves. Participants will explore the adventures of those who don't "fit the box" of one single race or ethnicity.

Discussion

What Do We Really Know About Our Neighbors? Are We Privileged, Racist, or Neither?

Do you really know how you would react if someone from just five miles away, on the "other side of the tracks," approached you for directions? Meet some new, unlikely friends and expand your views of people that doen't look or live like you.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion

Whose Civil Rights?: Trans-people of Color Navigating the U.S.

Civil rights are social and political freedoms that everyone in our society is supposed to have access to; however, because of socialization, bias, and discrimination, many trans people (particularly trans people of color) do not have access to these freedoms. In this session, we will explore the current cultural climate that enforces a gender binary and, therefore, forecloses civil rights for many trans people. We will examine how trans people are challenging and changing these systems.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion

Session 4

21st Century Voter Supression

A group discussion about the methods and regulations used in the US to deny or limit the voting rights of various minority groups. There will be a brief historical overview of American voting with short video clips. The main emphasis of the workshop will be how to recognize, identify, and combat modern voter suppression tactics. Attendees should come out with a few concrete plans or ideas to help address the problem moving forward.

Discussion, Collaborative Work

A People's History of Chicago

In the tradition of Howard Zinn, A People's History of Chicago is a poetic, progressive history that celebrates this great American city from the perspective of those on the margins whose stories are not often told. These 77 poems (for the city's 77 neighborhoods) lift up the everyday lives and rich resistance of those working people, poor people, and people of color whose cultural and political revolutions continue to shape the social landscape of this city, country, and world. A People's History of Chicago shares the perspectives of people who work and hustle here, the story of Chicago left out of the history books and tourists' lists of things to do.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion

Advancing Civil Rights or Reverse Discrimination?: Affirmative Action in Elite College Admissions (Part 2 of 2)

In this session, Professor OiYan Poon will provide a brief historical and legal overview of affirmative action policy as applied to selective college admissions. She will address common myths, which often unnecessarily incite racial tensions and anxiety. The presentation will be followed by an interactive activity that will give participants some insights into how affirmative action is enacted today in admissions processes at selective colleges and universities. This is a double-session workshop. Students must register for both sessions.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion

Affordable Housing and Racial Diversity

Should communities set policies so people who work there can afford to live there? What constitutes "affordable" housing? How do these questions connect to racial diversity on the North Shore? Why does diversity even matter?

Speaker or Presentation

Appropriate Alliances: Working in White Spaces

Students will lead this discussion on how white students can help break down stereotypes and other types of structural racism in white spaces. The discussion will also address why white guilt is an ineffective form of acknowledging racism. We will discuss how to be an effective supporter without appropriating other people's identities and moving from thought to action.

Discussion

Arche-What? Race Archetypes Under the Surface

American popular culture is built on a foundation of archetypal characters. These characters reflect and reaffirm societal beliefs of the time. In the case of our country they have perpetuated racism. In this session, we'll get a brief history lesson and watch clips from current media in order to ask ourselves if we have transcended these archetypes.

Discussion, Media Viewing

Black Gospel Music - Make a Joyful Noise!

Black gospel music speaks to the issue of freedom and in many ways has been part of the civil rights movement. In this workshop, you will learn about different aspects of gospel music, and then have the opportunity to sing and form an impromptu gospel choir. Participants should be prepared to sing and rasie your voice so that you can feel the power gospel music has to inspire and effect change.

Interactive

Black Lives Matter, or All Lives Matter? History, Context, and Critique

This workshop is designed to provide the historical context for both the Black Lives Matter and All Lives Matter movements, and examine the implications of both these movement in our lives, schools, and the United States.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion

Blackenomics 101 (The Movement, The Music, The Solution)

Rapper, entrepreneur, and activist, John the Author explores systemic racism in relation to building a black business and artist presence in minority communities. Empowering and embracing blackness is a way to move beyond the inequities seen in our country.

Speaker or Presentation, Peformance

Comedy and Civil Rights

This session will take a look at comedy focused on race and its role in the civil rights movement, both past and present. Through various video and audio clips, we'll explore how stand-up performers and TV comedy series have provided social commentary aimed to challenge our notions of race through the use of humor.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion, Media Viewing

Current Human Rights Struggles in Latin America

In this session students will learn about current human rights struggles in Latin America, and what role the US has played in encouraging these groups to take action.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion

Developing a Positive, Accountable White Activism for Racial Civil Rights

How can white people be effective, accountable agents for racial civil rights? How can we work with other white people to address racism? How can we follow the lead set by people of color? Join this session for an introduction to the critical link between white racial conciousness and taking action for racial justice.

Speaker or Presentation

From Diversity to Inclusion: True stories. Real people. Just actions.

This workshop is based on real-life experiences of multicultural & transracial families. We will use everyday scenarios to start conversation and evaluation about known and unknown assumptions we all have around difference. The session will emphasize the importance of inclusive families, schools, communities, and laws. By evaluating individual bias, constructing a cultural competence action plan, and applying it to everyday interactions, participants leave this workshop checking personal assumptions, identifying where those assumptions originate, and responding more appropriately to racial and cultural difference.

Discussion, Simulation or other Interactive Activity

Georgia Gilmore and The Club from Nowhere

Learn about how food played an integral part of the civil rights movement. We will learn about Georgia Gilmore and her efforts during the Montgomery Bus Boycott. This workshop includes making and sampling one of her famous recipes!

Collaborative Work, Simulation or other Interactive Activity

Get Up, Stand Up

Music has been an essential aspect of the Civil Rights Movement, protest, and identity in the US. This workshop will explore, through active participation, the music that has been used by generations to shine a light on marginalized populations throughout the world. Participants are encouraged to bring an instrument OR be willing to sing, shake a tambourine, maraca, or bang on a drum to fully engage in this important music

Collaborative Work, Performance, Simulation or other Interactive Activity

Implicit and Explicit Biases and Their Effect on Law Enforcement and the Community

In this session, Officer Owusu will define what implicit and explicit biases are and explore what effect they have within the judicial system and law enforcement.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion

It's 2017 . . . Why Are We Still Talking About Race?

How can we examine our own unconscious biases as an important step in understanding the roots of stereotypes and prejudice in our society? How can our individual actions transform our collective impact on the diversity we value? Explore unconscious bias, stereotypes, discrimination, racism, and privilege.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion

It's More than Black and White

Asians and Pacific Islanders can sometimes feel left out of the conversation and history about civil rights in the U.S.; however, their contributions have been overlooked and are seldom discussed. The goal of this presentation is to provide a brief history of contributions and a discussion of issues of Asian and Pacific Islander communities.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion, Media Viewing

Latinos in the U.S.A.

Latinos have a long history of contributing to U.S. culture and society which is often ignored or glossed over. We will explore ways in which Latinos are continuing to enrich the experience of all Americans, so that we can gain a better understanding of the integral role they play in our society.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion

Music of the Civil Rights Movement

How did popular music reflect the values of the Civil Rights movement of the 1960s and help the movement convey its message? Students will be introduced to the songs of different musical genres and learn how music both reflected and shaped the values and beliefs of the Civil Rights movement.

Speaker or Presentation, Media Viewing

Music Vs. Gun Violence

"If music can motivate someone to pick up a gun, can it also inspire them to put the guns down?" With this simple question, Music Vs Gun Violence was born in October 2015 It is a social movement spearheaded by Chicago Ideas, Leo Burnett Chicago, and Grammy-nominated Anthony "The Twilite Tone" Khan that aims to prevent gun violence through music. The campaign features "Put The Guns Down," an interactive music video that includes a string of performances from some of Chicago's best-known hip-hop and rap artists, such as Oscar and Grammy Award-winner Common, Lil Herb and King Louie, and allows you to download the beat and upload your own anti-gun violence lyrics. With each new submission on MusicVsGunViolence.com, the video and support for the initiative continues to make a difference against our city's biggest issue. The campaign has been featured in Rolling Stone, People, the Huffington Post and across the landscape of local Chicago media.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion

Poetry and Race

Come join the discussion about how poetry and race relate! We'll talk about poetry, perform/read some pieces, and you'll even have a chance to write your own poem. We're looking at race through the lens of poetry, and it's going to be awesome!

Performance, Discussion

Protesting for Civil Rights

During the session, the presenter will lead an informational discussion with student participants. The information will highlight salient civil rights leaders and their contributions made to generate change in America. Protesting for civil rights that led and leads to change will be a focal point for discussion that segues into personal dialogues regarding how to become agents of change and advocate for civil rights.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion

R.E.A.L.: Race, Equity, and Leadership - A Unique Course for High School Students (Part 2 of 2)

Experience a snapshot of a unique high school course that is grounded in the Courageous Conversations Protocol and designed on a college seminar model. Through interactive activities, videos, and discussion prompts, develop a deeper understanding of culturally relevant pedagogy and how it empowers students to become leaders for racial equity. This is a double-session workshop. Students must register for both sessions.

Speaker or Presentation

Race and the Criminal Justice System

In this workshop session, we will examine and discuss current events involving the criminal justice system, charges of police brutality, and the Black Lives Matter movement.

Discussion

Race, Class, and Police Interactions

Attorney Michael Robbins's most publicized case was in defense of the family of Laquan McDonald, the teenage boy shot by police in 2014. It was the dashcam video of that shooting that set off protests throughout the Chicago area and received national attention. Hear Robbins and his partner talk about the challenges they confront as they defend the legal rights of minorities.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion

Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities

This session will identify disparities and barriers to health that exist in America based upon race or ethnicity, education, income, location, or other social factors. We will discuss strategies that may address some of these health issues and positively impact local communities.

Speaker or Presentation

Racist Memorabilia Through the Ages

This workshop will focus on the different types of racist memorabilia that have been created throughout America's history. As well as memorabilia, it will focus on the evolution of prejudiced propaganda and the typical stereotypes of African Americans. This workshop will provide a chronological account of how these prejudiced mementos served to discourage African Americans from vocalizing their discontent with the society they were born into.

Speaker or Presentation

Rap with a Social Conscience: Exploring Race in Contemporary Music

We will examine the lyrics of several contemporary rap songs as we explore deeper meanings, historical context, cultural impact, and their intersections with race. Additionally, students will have the opportunity to analyze a song of their choosing.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion, Collaborative Work, Media Viewing, Performance

Revisiting To Kill a Mockingbird: Uncovering the Silence

We will revisit Harper Lee's classic favorite from the perspective of today's precarious relationship between people of color and the police. We will examine how the miscarriage of justice in To Kill a Mockingbird is received without any anger. Essentially, it is received in silence. Today, that is hardly the case. We will explore why there is an absence of anger by the African American community in Lee's novel. And why that absence should be addressed in classrooms today. We also will explore the current tensions between people -- often people of color -- and the police, and how this conflict can be traced to a prophetic message in Lee's novel.

Speaker or Presentation

Seeing the Unseen - The Bias All Around You (Part 2 of 2)

Most systemic racism is invisible...often to both "sides"...until you know it's there. Once you know it's there, you can't stop seeing it. In this workshop, you'll participate in an activity that will help you see the unseen, and possibly recognize some systemic biases that you see every day without realizing they are there. This is a double-period session. Students must register for both periods.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion, Simulation or other Interactive Activity

Setting Examples for Self-Love

This performance and writing workshop focuses on body and self-image positivity centered on embracing womanhood and blackness in the current culture.

Speaker or Presentation, Peformance

Take a Knee? Colin Kaepernick, Activism, and Symbols of America

Colin Kaepernick's kneeling during the national anthem has raised several questions that rattle or reinforce perspectives on American civil society. Come discuss and share your ideas on how identity shapes the way we interpret symbols. Time will be allotted so that students can share their ideas and respectfully disagree with one another.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion

Taking Action Against Injustice

Explore the importance of identifying biases and challenging stereotypes. Discover ways to create change in your own life.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion

The 1968 Olympics and the Salute Heard Round the World

After placing 1st and 3rd in the 200 meter final of the 1968 Olympics, two black American athletes received their medals with heads bowed and fists raised in the air while a third white athlete stood with them. This seminar will focus on the context of this event and the told and untold story of all three athletes captured in this iconic photo, as a means to explore the large and small impacts that come with standing up for what you believe.

Speaker or Presentation, Media Viewing

The Audacity to Heal: A Public Conversation about Surviving Sexual Assault

The Audacity to Heal includes rare and never-before-seen photos and video footage from the award-winning multi-media performance, Story of a Rape Survivor (SOARS). SOARS' creator, Scheherazade, discusses the role arts can play in creating a national movement to end sexual violence.

Speaker or Presentation, Peformance

The ERA: A Constitutional Amendment 94 Years in the Making

Got Rights? Which ones? Are you sure? In 1923, the National Woman's Party introduced the Equal Rights Amendment to Congress. In 1992, it passed through both houses of Congress, but has not yet been ratified by the required number of states. So what is this amendment? Why hasn't it been ratified? Do we even need it anymore? Let's talk about it!

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion, Collaborative Work, Media Viewing

The Improbable Civil War

The Civil War was fought, and the North won. These are two historical facts. Nevertheless, it was never a forgone conclusion that the war would be fought. Most of Lincoln's Cabinet was against it (they supported Southern secession). A sizable portion of the Abolitionist Movement also favored Southern secession. The population in the North was also very wary of the war. Waging the Civil War was primarily Abraham Lincoln's decision. What if it never happened? What if the South was allowed to secede? How long would chattel slavery have lasted in the Confederate States of America? And what does this tell us about the racial history of the United States? These and more questions will be discussed in this workshop.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion

Theft or Homage? A Discussion of Cultural Appropriation

In music, many idioms have their origins in African American culture and history. However, many of these are forms have been absorbed in all American Culture. Jazz and blues are great examples. Years ago, mixed bands were considered a step of progress. Now it is not uncommon to hear the expression, "white people stole jazz," and bands are increasingly segregated again. How can we take this paradigm shift and turn it into a force for healing?

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion, Media Viewing

Transforming Colombia: Working Towards Social Justice

The session will focus on the city of Medellin, its violent past, and how it has undergone major progressive social changes in the last twenty years to improve the lives of marginalized communities, who are mainly black, indigenous, poor, and displaced. Using Medellin as an example, we will discuss and compare Medellin's recent progress to what could be done in Chicago.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion

Uncovering Your Thoughts -- Why Do You Think That Way?

This session will explore how racial biases are unintentionally formed throughout our lives. Our experiences help form our own thoughts, opinions and biases starting at a very young age. We will explore some of these biases and start to uncover why we think the way think and work to challenge these ideas.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion, Media Viewing

We Charge Genocide: An Emergence of a Continued Movement

Monica Trinidad was one of eight youth delegates to travel to the United Nations in Geneva, Switzerland to deliver a report on police violence against youth of color in Chicago in November of 2014 . Monica will share her organizing work with We Charge Genocide, which was a grassroots effort named after the original petition of the same name in 1951. Her presentation will include video footage from Chicago and the United Nations in Geneva. She will then lead a hands-on workshop that will guide participants through a discussion of the Black Lives Matter movement today.

Speaker or Presentation, Simulation or other Interactive Activity

We Need Diverse Books

When was the last time you read a book where the main character was nothing like you? Did you know reading fiction can create empathy? This workshop will expose you to some great diverse characters and lead to a group discussion about why diverse books matter.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion

Whose Civil Rights?: Trans-people of Color Navigating the U.S.

Civil rights are social and political freedoms that everyone in our society is supposed to have access to; however, because of socialization, bias, and discrimination, many trans people (particularly trans people of color) do not have access to these freedoms. In this session, we will explore the current cultural climate that enforces a gender binary and, therefore, forecloses civil rights for many trans people. We will examine how trans people are challenging and changing these systems.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion

Words Matter: Racially Charged Language in U.S. Politics

In an election year, politicians may use specific language and phrases to speak to certain groups. We will discuss how far we far come in political campaigning and how far we still need to progress.

Discussion, Media Viewing

Working as an Ally in Anti-racist Movements

To understand today's struggle for racial civil rights is to understand your role within the movement, and what true progress not only looks like, but the process for which it is acheived. Movement work requires empathy, dialogue, understanding, and the willingness to go outside your comfort zone as an ally. This session covers the experiences of Andriana Bicanin, a New Trier graduate, working as an ally leading grassroots civll and human rights groups across the country, and the strong working and personal relationships that resulted from her work.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion

Session 5

A People's History of Chicago

In the tradition of Howard Zinn, A People's History of Chicago is a poetic, progressive history that celebrates this great American city from the perspective of those on the margins whose stories are not often told. These 77 poems (for the city's 77 neighborhoods) lift up the everyday lives and rich resistance of those working people, poor people, and people of color whose cultural and political revolutions continue to shape the social landscape of this city, country, and world. A People's History of Chicago shares the perspectives of people who work and hustle here, the story of Chicago left out of the history books and tourists' lists of things to do.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion

Appropriation vs. Appreciation: A Student-led Discussion on Culture

Students will be presented with some of the history of cultural appropriation in America and discuss current controversies over popular culture, media, musical expression, costumes, hair, sports mascots, and film representations of different cultures. While the session will begin with a presentation, students signing up for this session should be prepared to actively participate in the discussion.

Discussion

Arche-What? Race Archetypes Under the Surface

American popular culture is built on a foundation of archetypal characters. These characters reflect and reaffirm societal beliefs of the time. In the case of our country they have perpetuated racism. In this session, we'll get a brief history lesson and watch clips from current media in order to ask ourselves if we have transcended these archetypes.

Discussion, Media Viewing

Artistic Responses to Racism From a Dance Perspective

Through the use of historical video and audio clips, this session will share examples of how black dance artists (Alvin Ailey, Misty Copeland and others) developed a better understanding of their racial identity through the art of dance.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion, Media Viewing

Behind the Veil of Racism: Jane Elliot and Honest Conversations

In this session, participants will study the work of Jane Elliot through art and literature as it relates to Black and Brown people in America today.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion

Black Lives Matter, or All Lives Matter? History, Context, and Critique

This workshop is designed to provide the historical context for both the Black Lives Matter and All Lives Matter movements, and examine the implications of both these movement in our lives, schools, and the United States.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion

Bridging Religious Differences: Interfaith Youth Core

Come learn more about the Interfaith Youth Core, a national organization that promotes interreligious understanding and action on college campuses.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion

Cities of Peace: From Values to Actions

Cities of Peace is a cultural exchange program connecting young activists in Cambodia and Chicago around issues of state and interpersonal violence, community resistance, and healing. Join founding organizers Irina Zadov and Moses Williams for a short documentary film screening and a chance to interrogate your own sense of justice. Using movement and active listening activities, participants will create personal frameworks to move from values to action in their personal, family, school, and digital lives.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion

Civil Wrongs and Civil Rights

If you could rule the world, what would you do ? Identify ten workable solutions for addressing systematic racism.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion, Collaborative Work, Simulation or other Interactive Activity

Coffee and Community: Working Towards Peace in Woodlawn

Joel Hamernick will share his experiences in the Woodlawn Neighborhood, his thoughts on the causes of violence in Chicago, and what he is doing to change things. Mr. Hamerck is a successful entrepreneur who most recent venture is Greenline Coffee, which he established with his wife, Paula.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion

Current Human Rights Struggles in Latin America

In this session students will learn about current human rights struggles in Latin America, and what role the US has played in encouraging these groups to take action.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion

Developing a Positive, Accountable White Activism for Racial Civil Rights

How can white people be effective, accountable agents for racial civil rights? How can we work with other white people to address racism? How can we follow the lead set by people of color? Join this session for an introduction to the critical link between white racial conciousness and taking action for racial justice.

Speaker or Presentation

Empowering Upstanders: Using History to Inform our Actions Today

Everyone has a story and a voice. Who chooses to take a stand on behalf of themselves and others? We will look at historical photographs, film and a graphic novel to find out what we can do today to be upstanders instead of bystanders in our community today. How does an inclusive society benefit us all?

Discussion, Collaborative Work, Media Viewing

Examining Our Biases

To create an environment where everyone feels valued, we must recognize our personal biases and the impact they have on ourselves and others. Through interactive exercises lead by a conflict management specialist, participants will challenge their personal assumptions about many dimensions of diversity, assess the ramifications of these unchallenged assumptions, and consider how biases affect daily decisions. Lastly, we will discuss what steps we can take to develop a more inclusive environment at New Trier and in our communities.

Simulation or other Interactive Activity

From Alcatraz to the Dakota Access Pipeline: American Indian Civil Rights

This session will explore American Indian attempts to gain civil rights in American society. The session will include discussions of the Indian occupation of Alcatraz, the standoff at Wounded Knee, and the current controversy surrounding the Dakota Access Pipeline.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion, Media Viewing

Georgia Gilmore and The Club from Nowhere

Learn about how food played an integral part of the civil rights movement. We will learn about Georgia Gilmore and her efforts during the Montgomery Bus Boycott. This workshop includes making and sampling one of her famous recipes!

Collaborative Work, Simulation or other Interactive Activity

Home Sweet Home: Systemic Racism in Housing

Home, sweet home? In this session we will examine the roots of structural racism in housing policy and its long term implications. How have many African Americans been denied the American dream of home ownership and how has the denial of that dream had long term implications for black families hoping to become solidly middle class in America? The session will cover historical practices like redlining during the Great Depression, as well as current predatory lending and real estate steering practices.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion, Collaborative Work, Simulation or other Interactive Activity

Interracial Romance in American Film

In this session, we will watch clips from several movies, including, among others, Shadows (1959) and Guess Who's Coming to Dinner? (1967). Afterwards, we will engage in a discussion about how film has attempted to represent the "taboo" subject of interracial romance.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion, Media Viewing

It's 2017 . . . Why Are We Still Talking About Race?

How can we examine our own unconscious biases as an important step in understanding the roots of stereotypes and prejudice in our society? How can our individual actions transform our collective impact on the diversity we value? Explore unconscious bias, stereotypes, discrimination, racism, and privilege.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion

It's More than Black and White

Asians and Pacific Islanders can sometimes feel left out of the conversation and history about civil rights in the U.S.; however, their contributions have been overlooked and are seldom discussed. The goal of this presentation is to provide a brief history of contributions and a discussion of issues of Asian and Pacific Islander communities.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion, Media Viewing

Mass Incarceration: Race and Prison in America

America accounts for 4% of the world's population but 25% of the world's prison population. One in every fifteen people born in the United States in 2001 is expected to go to jail or prison. One in three black male babies born in this century is expected to be incarcerated, and no other country imprisons such a high percentage of its racial or ethnic minorities. This session will explore the development of mass incarceration and its consequences.

Speaker or Presentation

Microaggressions: Voices from Literature

This presentation will ask participants to read short selections by Claudia Rankine and Ta-Nehisi Coates and join in a discussion about what microaggressions are and how they contribute to systemic racism. These seemingly small events reveal a huge gap between what one person intends and what another person perceives. By looking at these situations in writing, we hope to raise awareness that cause unintended pain and build empathy.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion, Media Viewing

Mixed-Race at New Trier: Discussion and Resources

This is a discussion group for students who identify as mixed-race to talk, listen, and learn about the mixed-race experience at New Trier. Topics will include passing for white, feeling between identities, and code switching. A list of high-school and post-high-school resources will be provided. Students of all racially mixed identities are invited to participate.

Discussion

Music of the Civil Rights Movement

How did popular music reflect the values of the Civil Rights movement of the 1960s and help the movement convey its message? Students will be introduced to the songs of different musical genres and learn how music both reflected and shaped the values and beliefs of the Civil Rights movement.

Speaker or Presentation, Media Viewing

Native Americans, Pipelines, and Eminent Domain

In the news this fall, the fight over the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline continued for months as protestors and police clashed on the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation. This presentation and discussion focuses on the relevant constitutional law and historical treatment of Native Americans. This seminar aims to bring the issues surrounding this marginalized community to consideration.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion

Not a Day Has Passed

Not A Day Has Passed is a slideshow based on a brief article by Lee Mun Wah that reviews the racial events of violence and loss we have experienced over the past few years across the nation as well as within our community. We will review the article and watch the slideshow. We will discuss the impact of the events featured in the slideshow and talk about how they impact our experience at New Trier.

Discussion, Media Viewing

One Person One Vote: Can the Voting Rights Act Be Saved?

One of the key achievements of the Civil Rights Movement was protecting voting rights through the passage of the Voting Rights Act and the 24th amendment. In recent years more and more Americans have found their ability to vote restricted by new voter ID laws, limits on early voting, inadequate election day facilities, and voter disenfranchisement. How can we ensure that everyone's voice is heard, regardless of race, class, or geography? This session will briefly explore the history of voting rights, and ask students to engage in a variety of activities exploring current limits on voting access.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion, Media Viewing, Simulation or other Interactive Activity

Our World in the 21st Century, Our Rights in a Global Society

This interactive workshop will attempt to connect the lives of students with contemporary struggles of civil rights in the United States and their relevance to human rights. Using Maslow's hierarchy of needs as a guide, the presenter will demonstrate how each struggle is an effort to bring basic resources to communities in need.

Simulation or other Interactive Activity, Discussion

Protesting for Civil Rights

During the session, the presenter will lead an informational discussion with student participants. The information will highlight salient civil rights leaders and their contributions made to generate change in America. Protesting for civil rights that led and leads to change will be a focal point for discussion that segues into personal dialogues regarding how to become agents of change and advocate for civil rights.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion

Riot by Gwendolyn Brooks: Racially Motivated Violence Brought to Our Doorstep

Can people living in a community like ours really understand the motivations and actions of a marginalized black community? Brooks' short poem explores this question through by recounting one man's experience during a riot.

Discussion

Socialization and Implicit Bias

How do messages we've received throughout our lives impact the way we see our own and others' racial identities? We'll work to recognize our own implicit biases and identify actions that allow us to start changing these old patterns.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion

Socially Raised to Not Understand Racism: Racism in America 1991-2017

The patterned, shape-shifting nature of racism in the post-2007 election era makes the symptoms and disease of the man-made social factor of "race" visible. The often proclaimed idea that Americans are post-racial has been continually revealed to be false after each racial tragedy in the post-2007 election era. This workshop will position individuals to recognize and understand what racism is and what racism does throughout all three levels of American life in order for them to undergo the process of racial healing that can eradicate racism in their lives.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion

SPENT: A simulation to see how long you can survive on minimum wage.

Have you ever thought about what it would be like to live on minimum wage? What decisions do people on minimum wage have to make in order to make ends meet?

In this session, you will have the chance to put yourselves in the shoes of someone who lives week to week in this situation. Through an online simulation, you will be given a minimum wage job and you must make decisions to try to make it to the end of the month with enough money left over to pay your rent. We will explore the role that race plays in this experience - specifically, how systemic racism inherent in policies and institutions presents additional obstacles to people of color trying to get out of poverty.

Simulation or other Interactive Activity

That's So Ghetto: Exploring Race in Everyday Language

In this interactive workshop, we will explore how race plays out in our everyday language. Is it an example of political correctness, or is it a microagression?

Simulation or other Interactive Activity, Discussion

The Audacity to Heal: A Public Conversation about Surviving Sexual Assault

The Audacity to Heal includes rare and never-before-seen photos and video footage from the award-winning multi-media performance, Story of a Rape Survivor (SOARS). SOARS' creator, Scheherazade, discusses the role arts can play in creating a national movement to end sexual violence.

Speaker or Presentation, Peformance

The History of the Mexico-United States Border

This session will examine the history of the Mexico-United States border and how that history impacts our understanding of the border today.

Speaker or Presentation

The Improbable Civil War

The Civil War was fought, and the North won. These are two historical facts. Nevertheless, it was never a forgone conclusion that the war would be fought. Most of Lincoln's Cabinet was against it (they supported Southern secession). A sizable portion of the Abolitionist Movement also favored Southern secession. The population in the North was also very wary of the war. Waging the Civil War was primarily Abraham Lincoln's decision. What if it never happened? What if the South was allowed to secede? How long would chattel slavery have lasted in the Confederate States of America? And what does this tell us about the racial history of the United States? These and more questions will be discussed in this workshop.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion

Thin Red Line: The Adopted Asian-American Struggle with Identity and Sense of Place

International adoptions often involve Asian children placed with White couples in the U.S. This session will explore the question of identity for these adoptees, who may feel a dissociation from their place of birth as well as the community in which they have been raised.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion, Media Viewing

Transforming Colombia: Working Towards Social Justice

The session will focus on the city of Medellin, its violent past, and how it has undergone major progressive social changes in the last twenty years to improve the lives of marginalized communities, who are mainly black, indigenous, poor, and displaced. Using Medellin as an example, we will discuss and compare Medellin's recent progress to what could be done in Chicago.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion

Trump, Clinton, and Obama: How do Race and Gender Affect Portrayal in the Media?

Does the media cover people differently based solely on their race, ethnicity and gender? Are there different standards for public figures of different races and genders? I'll show you some examples to get the conversation started, but I really want to hear YOUR thoughts about what is really going on, how we got here, and where we're going.

Discussion, Media Viewing

Uncovering Your Thoughts -- Why Do You Think That Way?

This session will explore how racial biases are unintentionally formed throughout our lives. Our experiences help form our own thoughts, opinions and biases starting at a very young age. We will explore some of these biases and start to uncover why we think the way think and work to challenge these ideas.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion, Media Viewing

Urban Initiatives: Impacting Communities through Sport

A recent study suggests that while kids from high income families participate in youth sports at a rate of over 70%, that number is nearly cut in half for low income families. What are the benefits of such participation? Why and how is youth sports access an issue of civil rights? Explore these questions with Urban Initiatives, a sports-based youth development organization that works with over 15,000 students in 51 schools across Chicago to empower youth to become agents of community change through academic success, healthy living, and leadership development.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion

What Are You? When Race Is Not "Black" and "White"

Have you ever been asked "What are you?" upon meeting someone? Are you all mixed up on being Bi-and Multi-racial? We will explore our Bi-and Multi-racial selves. Participants will explore the adventures of those who don't "fit the box" of one single race or ethnicity.

Discussion

What Do We Really Know About Our Neighbors? Are We Privileged, Racist, or Neither?

Do you really know how you would react if someone from just five miles away, on the "other side of the tracks," approached you for directions? Meet some new, unlikely friends and expand your views of people that doen't look or live like you.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion

White Privilege in the College Admissions Process

This seminar will focus on white privilege in the college admissions process. We will discuss the history behind obstacles between minority students and higher education, as well as the difference between equity and equality. The discussion will focus on systemic racism and dispel myths surrounding Affirmative Action and college admissions.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion

Words Matter: Racially Charged Language in U.S. Politics

In an election year, politicians may use specific language and phrases to speak to certain groups. We will discuss how far we far come in political campaigning and how far we still need to progress.

Discussion, Media Viewing

Working as an Ally in Anti-racist Movements

To understand today's struggle for racial civil rights is to understand your role within the movement, and what true progress not only looks like, but the process for which it is acheived. Movement work requires empathy, dialogue, understanding, and the willingness to go outside your comfort zone as an ally. This session covers the experiences of Andriana Bicanin, a New Trier graduate, working as an ally leading grassroots civll and human rights groups across the country, and the strong working and personal relationships that resulted from her work.

Speaker or Presentation, Discussion